About

Helmsley is the largest private philanthropy focused on Crohn’s disease, a complex, chronic inflammatory bowel disease that impacts more than 2 million people around the world. We are committed to addressing the unmet needs of people living with the disease, investing in research and technologies that will improve care and treatment for patients, and finding a cure.

Collaboration is essential to achieving our goals. We partner with organizations to support new research and ideas, and have built a network of researchers, institutions, and organizations working to find a cure for Crohn’s disease. We encourage our grantees to tap into this network, work together, and share ideas.

Our work focuses on funding in four key and interrelated areas: prevention, disease management, therapeutics, and diagnostics.

Prevention

The causes of Crohn’s disease involve a complex interplay among a patient’s genetic makeup, their immune system, and environmental factors, but the details are poorly understood. We support research to uncover further its root causes and identify how the disease develops.

The number of people living with Crohn’s disease is on the rise globally, particularly in newly industrialized countries across Africa, Asia, and South America, where previously there were few cases. Studying the factors driving this increase could provide important new insights into its causes and identify how the disease develops.

Diet plays a major role in Crohn’s disease. We fund research to better understand the effects of different foods on intestinal health, and on gut microbes, which are known to play a role in the disease, and to guide dietary choices that will benefit patients.

Diagnostics

Accessible, accurate, non-invasive, and cost-effective diagnostics will enable more precise treatment decisions as well as timely monitoring for people with Crohn’s disease – which can inform further fine-tuning of therapeutic plans. Helmsley funding supports the development of biomarkers, indices and standards, patient reported outcomes, imaging modalities, and other novel technologies and devices, to improve personalized care and lead to better outcomes.

Therapeutics

About half of Crohn’s disease patients do not respond to available therapies, so the need for new and more effective treatments is critical. Helmsley invests in research to understand the mechanisms underlying the disease and to identify and test novel therapies to accelerate the development of new treatments.

As the underlying mechanisms driving the disease are thought to vary among patients, individualizing patient treatment is a priority in Crohn’s disease. Investigating new therapeutics and optimizing existing treatment regimens will allow for improved patient outcomes.

Disease Management

Once a person is diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, they are met with a lifelong challenge that requires daily action and care to help with managing their disease. Patients deserve easily accessible, high-quality care built on informed, collaborative decision-making with their providers.

Patients and their caregivers need better tools and resources which are accessible for all regardless of geography. This includes leveraging technology to improve quality of life, monitoring symptoms to detect and predict flares, and improving access to mental healthcare resources, which can help mitigate the stress that is often caused by dealing with a chronic disease like Crohn’s.

News & Insights

Understanding the Emergence of Crohn’s Disease in South Asians


Groundbreaking research study sheds light on environmental factors that may contribute to a growing incidence ...

Expanding Access to Telemedicine for People Living with Crohn’s Disease


A Conversation with Dr. Corey Siegel Last month, Helmsley announced a grant of $593,736 to Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

Sneha Dave of Health Advocacy Summit Quoted in CNN COVID Coverage

CNN quotes Sneha Dave, founder and executive director of Helmsley grantee Health Advocacy Summit, while covering the challenges of living with a chronic disease like Crohn’s disease during a global pandemic: https://cnn.it/2RADsY0


Sneha Dave of Health Advocacy Summit Quoted in CNN COVID Coverage

Findings from the Diet & IBD Workshop

Co-hosted by Helmsley and the Kenneth Rainin Foundation, a workshop held in April 2018 brought together leading researchers and stakeholders to discuss the role of diet, nutrition, and the microbiome in preventing and treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A summary report is now available to outline the key findings from the workshop with an emphasis on gaps in knowledge, potential answers to address these gaps, and priorities for future research. 


Read the Summary of Findings


Findings from the Diet & IBD Workshop

Helmsley Funds Dartmouth-Hitchcock to Expand Telehealth across Northern New England

Access to Holistic, Specialty Care for Crohn’s Disease to Increase


NEW YORK, NY —  Today, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced a grant of $593,736 to Dartmouth-Hitchcock to improve access to specialty care for people living with Crohn’s disease across northern New England. Dartmouth-Hitchcock will expand its current telemedicine program for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), creating a Virtual IBD Center to extend its Crohn’s disease expertise across the region. Based at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH, the Virtual IBD Center will serve Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. 


Nationwide, there is a shortage of specialists for Crohn’s disease. This shortage is especially acute in rural communities. Northern New England is no exception. As a result of limited access to gastroenterologists in general, and specifically those with Crohn’s expertise, people living in rural regions with Crohn’s disease have a higher risk of emergency department visits and hospitalizations compared to those with reliable access to an expert care team. 


With Helmsley funding, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Virtual IBD Center will expand access to its holistic care for people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This will include gastroenterologists with expertise in Crohn’s disease management and treatment, a Crohn’s disease nurse coordinator, and additional support from a psychologist, dietician, and a pharmacist. 


“Living with Crohn’s disease is a daily, life-long challenge that requires a team of support to do well. Access to expertise makes an enormous difference in treatment plans, outcomes, and quality of life,” said Sandor Frankel, Trustee of the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Virtual IBD Center will offer comprehensive care that meets people where they are, partnering with individuals and their local providers, all enabled by technology, and can serve as a model of care for others.” 


A decade ago we were among the first foundations to invest in telehealth, and it’s a milestone moment for Helmsley to extend support for this 21st century model of care to those living with Crohn’s disease.


Pretima Persad, Program Officer



Led by Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Section Chief of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dr. Corey A. Siegel, this project was planned in late 2019 and early 2020 to address the needs of a widely dispersed rural patient population, and is now all the more timely in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has demonstrated the tremendous value of telemedicine to bring care to people wherever they may be. 


“As a physician, I’ve dedicated my career to building an expert team around me to help as many people as possible lead healthy lives. By leveraging telemedicine, we can extend the reach of the care my team and I provide,” said Dr. Siegel. “Too often, people living with Crohn’s come to our clinic after they have already endured too much suffering. The best way to treat Crohn’s disease is to be proactive and out in front of the disease as opposed to treating the complications that Crohn’s can cause. This requires a team of providers focusing on all aspects of how Crohn’s can impact people living with this disease. The Virtual IBD Center will make a great stride towards increasing access to this support.”


“Helmsley is committed to ensuring that geography does not limit a person’s access to the health care that they need to thrive,” said Pretima Persad, Program Officer of the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “A decade ago we were among the first foundations to invest in telehealth, and it’s a milestone moment for Helmsley to extend support for this 21st-century model of care to those living with Crohn’s disease.”


Contact:


Lauren Amaio, lamaio@globalstrategygroup.com, 212-235-6219


About the Helmsley Charitable Trust

The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust aspires to improve lives by supporting exceptional efforts in the U.S. and around the world in health and select place-based initiatives. Since beginning its active grantmaking in 2008, Helmsley has committed more than $2.5 billion for a wide range of charitable purposes. Helmsley's Crohn's Disease Program supports impactful ideas and mobilizes a global community committed to improving the lives of Crohn's disease patients while pursuing a cure. 



Helmsley Funds Dartmouth-Hitchcock to Expand Telehealth across Northern New England

Helmsley Funds the Asian Healthcare Foundation in Southern India to Improve Care for Crohn’s Disease Patients Living Below the Poverty Line

Crohn’s disease on the rise in India; new grant will help raise awareness and prevent misdiagnosis


Today, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced a grant to the Asian Healthcare Foundation (AHF) to improve access to diagnostics for Crohn’s disease patients who are uninsured or living below the poverty line in Southern India. AHF is the research and training wing of Hyderabad’s Asian Institute of Gastroenterology (AIG), the largest gastroenterology hospital in the world, serving 10,000 patients daily.


Crohn’s disease incidence is rising in India, where the burden is second only to the U.S. Researchers believe the numbers are actually much higher as cases are often misdiagnosed. Indeed, Crohn’s disease is complicated to diagnose generally, and especially in a country where infectious diseases are still prevalent and many have symptoms similar to Crohn’s. Mis- or delayed diagnosis often leads to further health complications, which can include the need for surgery.


With Helmsley funding, AIG will be able to increase screenings for symptomatic patients with suspected Crohn’s disease using a basic blood test, abdominal ultrasound, and colonoscopy. These screenings will be free of cost for the 20% of people who live below the poverty line, or who can’t pay, to ensure early diagnosis and better health outcomes for everyone.


“Living with Crohn’s disease is a daily, lifelong challenge. Too often, the first challenge is a proper diagnosis. The Helmsley Charitable Trust is committed to supporting patients’ access to a full spectrum of care around the world,” said Sandor Frankel, Trustee of the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “As Crohn’s disease becomes more common in countries like India undergoing an epidemiologic transition from infectious to chronic diseases, doctors need support distinguishing between the two, and know which therapies are best suited for which patients. Helmsley’s support to AIG will help make this possible.”


Led by Dr. Rupa Banerjee, a top gastroenterologist in India, this project will identify best practices and guidelines for Crohn’s disease care there. A newly created patient data repository and biobank will support future global research, offering opportunities to explore possible triggers of the disease, and to compare etiology among Crohn’s disease patients from different parts of the world. These analyses will potentially inform greater precision in treatment recommendations for South Asian patients, with care tailored to their specific needs and not based on what works in the U.S. and Europe.


“Access to and affordability of diagnostics are major challenges for Crohn’s disease patients in India, and there is an urgent need for early diagnosis,” said Dr. Rupa Banerjee, Director of the IBD Center at AIG. “This grant will allow us to screen patients in need, which will ensure timely treatment and better health outcomes.”


“Dr. Banerjee is impressive both in how she serves the immediate community in India, and how she partners with gastroenterologists and epidemiologists all over the globe. Helmsley values this collaborative mindset and the importance of sharing research findings to drive greater impact,” said Pretima Persad, Program Officer of the Helmsley Charitable Trust.



Helmsley Funds the Asian Healthcare Foundation in Southern India  to Improve Care for Crohn’s Disease Patients Living Below the Poverty Line

Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Support for Health Advocacy Summit and Its Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network

As part of Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week,  The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced a $60,000 grant to the Health Advocacy Summit (HAS) and its Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network, a youth-led nonprofit organization that supports and equips young adults living with invisible illnesses, such as Crohn’s disease, with the skills to manage these debilitating and often misdiagnosed diseases. 


With Helmsley funding, HAS will host five two-day convenings across the country in 2020 bringing together young people to discuss how to navigate complex healthcare systems, insurance, mental health, and health policy, and most importantly to actively promote their health. Growing up with a chronic illness such as Crohn’s disease and transitioning to adulthood can pose unique challenges in navigating many aspects of the healthcare system, such as insurance, going from school to the workplace, and managing other psychosocial implications. HAS is the first organization created by young adults to empower, connect, and support others through in-person support and yearlong programming. HAS is taking the first step to facilitate conversations around health literacy and taking charge of one’s own health. HAS is led entirely by young adults with chronic and rare illnesses and was created by Sneha Dave, a college student and patient living with ulcerative colitis since age six.


“As the next generation of advocates, we could not be more grateful for the support of the Helmsley Charitable Trust to train, empower, and connect young patients who are the face of healthcare,” said Sneha Dave, founder and executive director of Health Advocacy Summit. “We are thankful to Helmsley for believing in the importance of supporting young patients who are facing life-altering conditions like Crohn’s disease.” 


“The Helmsley Charitable Trust is committed to helping the young adult Crohn’s disease patient community access the resources they need to manage their disease,” said Pretima Persad of the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. “Health Advocacy Summit is filling an important gap for patients by equipping young adults with key tools and information to navigate their disease and live a healthy life.”


Helmsley’s support will allow HAS to expand and facilitate more summits for young adults with chronic and rare illnesses and the international fellowship program for young adults with inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn’s disease.



About Health Advocacy Summit 


Health Advocacy Summit (HAS) is a nonprofit organization that works to empower and connect young adults with chronic and rare diseases. HAS is currently operating in several states across the U.S., and its program Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network facilitates a fellowship program to train the next generation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease advocates. For more information, please visit healthadvocacysummit.org and ccyanetwork.org.


 


About the Helmsley Charitable Trust 


The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust aspires to improve lives by supporting exceptional efforts in the U.S. and around the world in health and select place-based initiatives. Since beginning its active grantmaking in 2008, Helmsley has committed more than $2.5 billion for a wide range of charitable purposes. Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program supports impactful ideas and mobilizes a global community committed to improving the lives of Crohn’s disease patients while pursuing a cure. For more information, please visit helmsleytrust.org


Helmsley Charitable Trust Announces Support for Health Advocacy Summit and Its Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network

Scientists to Create a “Gut Cell Atlas” with Funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust

October 25, 2019 – Today, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced $13 million in new grants to create a Gut Cell Atlas, cataloguing the many cell types in the small and large intestines. The initiative aims to understand distinct cell functions and interactions in human health and Crohn’s disease. Helmsley’s Gut Cell Atlas initiative is part of the larger Human Cell Atlas, an international effort to map all cells in the human body.


Human bodies are composed of trillions of cells. Each one matters, yet there is no complete catalog of all the cell types in the human body and little is known about how cells function and work together in tissues such as the gut. Advances in technology – namely analyses of gene expression at single-cell resolution and in spatial contexts – offer a new frontier for understanding both health and disease at the cellular level.

Scientists to Create a “Gut Cell Atlas” with Funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust

University of Glasgow Awarded Over $1.1M to Tackle Crohn’s Disease in Children and Adults with a Novel Diet

The University of Glasgow has received $1.1 million from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, regular solid food-based diet to improve clinical outcomes in adults and children with active Crohn’s disease.


The grant was awarded to further build on recent research led by Dr. Konstantinos Gerasimidis and his team looking into a practical alternative to the commonly used liquid-only diet treatment for Crohn’s disease, also known as exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN).


The team of researchers, in collaboration with doctors at NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde (NHSGGC), developed ‘CD-TREAT’ (Crohn’s Disease TReatment with EATing), which uses everyday foods to achieve the same gut microbiome changes as those seen in treatment with EEN. The researchers recently published their findings in the world’s highest ranked journal for gut diseases and their treatment, Gastroenterology.


Crohn’s disease is a chronic, debilitating condition of the gastrointestinal tract which can lead to diarrhoea, blood in stools, abdominal pain, weight loss and growth failure. The administration of EEN liquid-only diet for eight weeks is an established method for inducing remission in children with Crohn’s disease. EEN is successful in around 80% of patients but is very restrictive and often requires feeding directly to the stomach, using a tube via the nose. Difficulty adhering to this diet, particularly for adults, is the biggest barrier for use of EEN as an induction dietary therapy.


Using a carefully designed meal plan, which includes foods such as chicken and rice soup, salmon and mashed potatoes, the scientists were able to show that CD-TREAT changes the gut microbiome composition and function in healthy people and in animals with gut inflammation, in a similar way to EEN. In a different part of the study three out of five children with active Crohn’s Disease treated in a CD-TREAT pilot entered complete remission on the alternative food-based diet and their gut inflammation decreased. The healthy adult participants in the trial reported that CD-TREAT was easier to comply with, and more satiating than EEN.


Dr Gerasimidis, Senior Lecturer at the University of Glasgow, said: “We are delighted to receive more than $1.1 million in funding from Helmsley. This will enable us to further our important research into more tolerable treatments for Crohn’s disease and to understand their mechanism of action.


“We are optimistic that the clinical effect of CD-TREAT will be replicated in larger studies and will compare well with other mainstream drug therapies. If these initial findings are replicated, doctors, nurses and dietitians will be able to decrease or replace potentially harmful and expensive drugs and even avoid surgery, for at least some patients. All of these have clear implications for improving the quality of life of patients with Crohn’s disease.”


Shefali Soni, Ph.D., Crohn’s Disease Program Officer of the Helmsley Charitable Trust, said: “Until a cure is found, Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program is committed to improving patients’ everyday lives. Diet is one of the key environmental factors that shapes our gut microbiota and our efforts to find better treatments for patients include dietary interventions. The team at the University of Glasgow is exploring a potentially transformative therapy by creating a solid food-based version of the well-known EEN.”


The full paper in Gastroenterology can be found here.




University of Glasgow Awarded Over $1.1M to Tackle Crohn’s Disease in Children and Adults with a Novel Diet

Helmsley Charitable Trust Funds Effort to Understand the Role of Stress in Managing Crohn’s Disease

4YouandMe to Explore How Wearable and Mobile Devices Can Measure Stress and Predict Symptoms in Crohn’s Disease Patients


Today, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust announced a $1.7 million grant to 4YouandMe to explore how tracking stress could predict symptoms of Crohn’s disease. Using smartwatches, smart rings, smart scales, and smartphones in a cohort of over 200 people with Crohn’s disease, 4YouandMe will track physiological stress signals and correlate these measures with patient-reported symptoms and clinical outcomes. This study aims to provide insights into the role of stress to guide Crohn’s disease management.


Living with a chronic, inflammatory condition like Crohn’s disease can cause stress and higher rates of depression and anxiety. Because stress measures are subjective, their perceived impact varies by patient – making it difficult to use patients’ self-reported outcomes of stress to guide disease management and treatment. Currently, few existing studies explore the effects of stress, mood, and sleep on the progression of disease.  


“Incorporating technology to better understand and manage Crohn’s disease is central to Helmsley’s goal of empowering all patients to improve their quality of life and care,” said Dr. Garabet Yeretssian, Director of Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program. “4YouandMe will fill a critical gap in disease management by providing a valid, data-driven look at how stress impacts people with Crohn’s disease.”


Led by experts in health technology, 4YouandMe explores how smartphones and wearable devices can forecast an individual’s symptom transitions and enable patients to better manage their conditions. 4YouandMe ultimately plans to develop a forecasting algorithm for Crohn’s disease symptoms by using mathematical models that correlate data on patients’ stress responses with their symptom changes.


4YouandMe, founded in 2017 to help lower the burden of chronic disease for all people, is led by Dr. Stephen H. Friend, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Sage Bionetworks where he was co-founder and President. Prior to founding 4YouandMe, Dr. Friend has held positions at Apple Inc. and Merck, and Co Inc., founded and led Rosetta Inpharmatics, and was an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School.


“We are very pleased to be able to study the feasibility of employing wearables to follow stress and how this might be a factor in the flares seen among patients with Crohn’s disease,” said Dr. Friend. “With our coalition partners at Mount Sinai, Oxford University, Evidation Health, and the Vector Institute, we hope to take the common appreciation that stress plays some role in symptoms of this disease and develop objective measures that individuals might eventually use smartphones and wearables to better co-pilot their own conditions.”



Contact


Silan Akgul, Communications Associate


sakgul@helmsleytrust.org


212-953-2854


Helmsley Charitable Trust Funds Effort to Understand the Role of Stress  in Managing Crohn’s Disease

McGill University’s Centre of Genomics and Policy Receives Funding to Create Ethics and Governance Resources for the Human Cell Atlas Initiative

New Policies, Tools, and Support to Enable Efficient, Ethical International Data Sharing for this Global Effort to Map All Cells in the Human Body


The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable...

McGill University’s Centre of Genomics and Policy Receives Funding to Create Ethics and Governance Resources for the Human Cell Atlas Initiative

Helmsley Grants UC San Diego $4.7M to Study Crohn’s Disease

Two grants aim to advance more personalized treatments for patients


Dr. Pradipta Ghosh, Soumita Das, Larry Smarr and Jürgen Schulze—researchers in diverse disciplines at the University of California San Diego—will aim to improve surgical outcomes and therapeutics for Crohn’s disease patients through $4.7 million in new grants from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. Helmsley’s goal is to find a cure for Crohn’s disease, a long-term pursuit in parallel with improving patients’ lives today.


“UC San Diego is pursuing innovative ideas that align with Helmsley’s goal of advancing precision medicine for Crohn’s disease patients,” said Garabet Yeretssian, director of Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program. “Researchers at UC San Diego are at the forefront of developing more individualized therapeutics for people with Crohn’s disease and improving lives.”


Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, the symptoms of which include persistent diarrhea, internal bleeding and chronic pain. In the United States, 201 of every 100,000 individuals suffer from the disease, and these numbers are steadily rising. The incidence and prevalence of Crohn’s disease are increasing rapidly in developing countries, attributed largely to the swift modernization and westernization of society. There is an urgent need to prevent, diagnose early and reconcile the most effective and appropriate treatments for patients.


Transforming Crohn’s disease therapeutics


A $3.5 million grant will allow Ghosh, professor and director of the Center for Network Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, and Das, assistant professor, chief scientific officer and director of HUMANOID Center of Research Excellence at UC San Diego School of Medicine to assemble a transdisciplinary team of cellular, molecular and stem-cell biologists along with computer science engineers, pathologists and gastroenterologists. Together, they will build and validate a stem cell-based “gut-in-a-dish” model of Crohn’s disease, as a “Phase 0” human model before clinical trials.


The stem cells will be derived from intestinal biopsies of patients with the disease and used to reverse-engineer the gut lining. The model will encompass the microbes, immune cells and other complex cell types found in the gut.


“This approach will help us to predict an individual’s response to therapeutics and, thus, personalize treatments—reducing the chances he or she will be prescribed a drug that won’t work or might have negative side effects,” said Ghosh.


“At present, there is no cure for Crohn's disease, and we believe our cutting-edge stem-cell based disease model will precisely identify effective treatment options, predict the outcome of clinical trials and provide the patients a high quality of life,” said Das.


3D medical imaging pilot to support surgical treatment


With $1.2 million in funding, a team of researchers from the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at UC San Diego will refine existing software used to translate two-dimensional (2D) medical imagery into interactive three-dimensional (3D) images that better reveal the common occurrence of strictures, narrowing and/or twisting of the small and large intestines, in Crohn’s disease patients.


Traditionally, surgeons rely upon radiologists’ readings of the 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans to map out the digestive tract and treatment plan. However, the lack of detail can increase the probability that a patient will need to undergo several invasive procedures before medical professionals identify the most appropriate one. To support pre-operative planning, the team at UC San Diego will create a dynamic 3D model using the patient’s own MRI and/or CT 2D data. Results of this pilot project could improve surgical outcomes, as well as improve patient experience and understanding of the illness. With this enhanced knowledge, patients and surgeons can plan the most effective intervention based on their own unique anatomy.


“Our team developed the initial software to support my own surgical sigmoid colon resection in 2016. While working with my medical team using our one-off 3D representations of my colon, it quickly became evident that what was needed is a tool to enable doctors and surgeons to work routinely in the 3D reality of their patients,” said Larry Smarr, director of Calit2 and principal investigator on the project—and a Crohn’s disease patient himself. “Helmsley’s support will allow us to further develop the software and understand how its use can improve outcomes for patients.”


The pilot project brings together a unique cross-disciplinary team of doctors, surgeons, radiologists and computer scientists, including Jürgen Schulze, an associate research scientist with Calit2’s Qualcomm Institute and a leading authority on developing software for application of immersive virtual reality to medical situations.


“The software system we are going to develop, along with the entire data processing pipeline from MRI or CT image acquisition to a detailed 3D model of the colon, is going to allow surgeons to plan exactly what they need to do during surgery for Crohn’s disease patients. Our approach may well be applicable to other diseases in the future,” said Schulze.



Helmsley Grants UC San Diego $4.7M to Study Crohn’s Disease

How Dr. Rupa Banerjee Is Working to Improve Crohn’s Disease Care in India


Crohn’s disease incidence is rising in India, where the burden is second only to ...

Leveraging Insights from Genetics to Understand the Roots of Crohn’s Disease


Researchers at the Broad Institute are leading an investigation to determine how Crohn’s disease ...
Recent Grants

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Amount: $1,507,370
Term of Grant: 36 Months
Date of Award: 06.22.2021

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, Inc.

Amount: $3,202,200
Term of Grant: 36 Months
Date of Award: 06.22.2021

Icahn School Of Medicine At Mount Sinai

Amount: $2,206,164
Term of Grant: 36 Months
Date of Award: 05.19.2021

University of Massachusetts Medical School

Amount: $1,737,020
Term of Grant: 36 Months
Date of Award: 05.19.2021

Crohn’s and Colitis Canada

Amount: $1,702,657
Term of Grant: 36 Months
Date of Award: 05.19.2021

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Our Team
Paul Scholl

Dr. Paul Scholl is the Program Director of the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program.


Prior to joining Helmsley, he was associate medical head for the immunology the...
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Paul Scholl

Program Director

Dr. Laurie Churchill is a Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. Laurie oversees the diagnostics portfolio of grants, identifying and evaluating new opport...
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Laurie Churchill

Program Officer

Dr. Jessica Langer is a Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. Jessica helps to manage the program’s research grants portfolio and to identify new opport...
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Jessica Langer

Program Officer

Pretima Persad is a Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust's Crohn's Disease Program. In this role, Pretima oversees the disease management portfolio of grants and works to identify and...
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Pretima Persad

Program Officer

Dr. Shefali Soni is a Program Officer for the Crohn’s Disease Program. In this role, Shefali oversees and manages the prevention grants portfolio and helps identify and evaluate new initiatives w...
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Shefali Soni

Program Officer

Terry Felton

Dr. Terry Felton is an Associate Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. In this role, Terry supports the diagnostics portfolio of grants that aim to identi...
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Terry Felton

Associate Program Officer

Kerry Hernandez

Dr. Kerry Hernandez is an Associate Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. Kerry contributes to managing the Program’s portfolio of prevention grants, wh...
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Kerry Hernandez

Associate Program Officer

Laura Hobstetter

Laura Hobstetter is an Associate Program Officer for the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program. In this role, Laura helps to oversee the disease management portfolio of grants and...
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Laura Hobstetter

Associate Program Officer

Stephanie LeValley

Dr. Stephanie LeValley is an Associate Program Officer for Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program. In this role, Stephanie supports the therapeutics portfolio of grants to promote novel therapeutic...
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Stephanie LeValley

Associate Program Officer

Kortney Hensley is an Administrative Assistant for Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program. As Administrative Assistant, she provides scheduling, travel, and expense reporting support for the progra...
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Kortney Hensley

Administrative Assistant